Category Archives: Green Technology

Calling All Innovators: Why You Should Join the Detect and Protect Challenge

In this week’s podcast, we take a closer look at The COVID-19 Detect & Protect Challenge. Hackster.io co-founder Adam Benzion and I chat about why The United Nations Development Programme and a multinational group of companies got together to create this challenge, the goals, prizes, and details associated with this design challenge, and most importantly, how your open source designs can help make the world a better place. Also this week, we check out new flexible sensor technology developed at MIT that is hoping to make vital sign monitoring a whole lot easier. 

 

Engineering the Edge: How Intel is Looking to Train One Million Engineers

Did you know that the edge computing market is forecasted to reach almost nine billion by 2023? 
In this week’s episode of Fish Fry, Mathew Formica (Director of Edge AI Developer Scale - Intel) and I chat about the the biggest challenges in edge computing today, what's included in Intel’s OpenVino Tool Kit, and how Intel and Udacity are looking to train one million developers with their Intel Edge AI for IoT Developers Nanodegree Program. Also this week, I take a closer look at a new low-cost, low-power carbon dioxide sensing platform developed at Purdue University and how it could help drastically reduce energy usage for commercial buildings and homes alike.

Return of the Pi!

In this week’s podcast, we are talking about the newest generation of Raspberry Pi, why old coding skills are in big demand right now, and why a new class of organic batteries may be just a proton away! First, we investigate a new all-organic battery technology developed at Uppsala University that can be charged in seconds and discharged and recharged over 500 times without loss of any kind. Next, Sarah Fawcett (element14) brings us the goods on the new Raspberry Pi 4. Sarah and I chat about the details of their All-in-One Kit for Quick-Start Embedded Computing and how Sarah helped create some unique home-based Raspberry Pi applications. Finally, we take a look at why the Governor of New Jersey sent out a call for programmers with COBOL experience to join the digital frontlines.

Inventing Actionable Intelligence

Actionable intelligence and inference at the edge takes center stage in this week’s Fish Fry podcast. First up, we take a closer look at how drones can be taught to echolocate (like bats and dolphins) with a little help from a speaker, four microphones and a whole lot of math. Next, Nigel Forrester (Concurrent Technologies) and I chat about radio frequency signal intelligence, the benefits of a heterogeneous resource pool, and the details of Concurrent Tech's new artificial intelligence accelerator board.
 

Small is Beautiful: Trends in Small Rugged Form Factors and Making Fossil Fuels into Diamonds

What if we could use something that is universally hated to create something that most everyone loves? In this weeks podcast, we start things off with an investigation into how a group of researchers have created the first “clean process” synthetic diamond from petroleum and natural gas. Also this week, Ivan Straznicky (Curtiss-Wright) and I discuss the challenges of ruggedized small form factor designs and why he believes it is time for a new standards in this space. 

 

The Sustainment Slog

“It is what it is till it ain’t” - Mac Miller, 2019

When does sustainment become a slog? When does the bottom one percent of your sales start becoming too much to bear? In this week’s Fish Fry, we are diving into the world of OEM product pruning with Ethan Plotkin and Siku Thompson from GDCA. Ethan, Siku and I discuss supply chain trust, integrated sustainment, and the hidden costs associated with ad hoc orders. Also this week, we take a closer look at some revolutionary new research from Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab that is creating drinking water from atmospheric humidity.

New Kid on the Block

This week’s podcast is one part frog embryo, one part embedded design, and one part crystal ball! To start things off, we take a closer look at how a team of research scientists have created a new form of life (a living, programmable organism called a Xenobot) with a little help from African frog embryos, a algorithm that simulates designs for new life-forms, and the Deep Green supercomputer cluster at the Vermont Advanced Computing Core. Also this week, Dunstan Power (ByteSnap Design) and I discuss a variety of design trends for 2020, including the rise of RISC-V, the role of security in embedded design, and why he expects to see a big push into machine learning-driven by tools from Xilinx and Intel.

Hyperscale to the Rescue!

In this week’s podcast we take a closer look at how the increase of machine to machine data traffic has encouraged a movement toward spine leaf architecture and die-to-die connectivity in hyperscale data centers. Manmeet Walia (Synopsys) joins me this week to discuss the evolution of data center technology and how the challenges surrounding cache currency and network functionality is driving change in the world of hyper scale data centers.  Also this week, we check out a new Kickstarter campaign called Flash Forest that is looking to plant a billion trees by 2028 with a little help from a specialized fleet of drones! 

 

All of the Information: The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly

Did you know that over a hundred devices are connected to the internet every second? In this week’s episode of Fish Fry, we take a closer look at the challenges facing us as we develop the next generation of connected devices. Tom Doyle (CEO - Aspinity) joins me to discuss the details of Aspinity’s innovative RAMP (Reconfigurable Analog Modular Processor) platform, the "deal breakers" as he sees them when it comes to IoT designs, and why the answer to our always-on, always-sensing power challenges is architectural. Also this week, we check out Kickstarter’s Make 100 campaign and a new kind of high-performance multilayer piezo speaker from TDK called PiezoListen.  

 

The Internet of Many Things

The Internet of Things takes center stage in this week’s episode of Fish Fry. First up, we investigate a new sensor platform developed at Stanford University called BodyNet and how this new device can track both the pulse and rate of respiration by detecting the expansion and contraction of skin. Also this week, Mark Milligan and I discuss the future of the internet of things and how the Enlighted platform is looking to redefine what a smart building can be.