Category Archives: Health

Brain-a-Palooza! Advancements in Brain-Hand Communication and Your Brain on Code

In our first Fish Fry podcast of 2021, we sit down with Dr. Scott Frey (University of Missouri) and chat about the challenges and newest advancements in brain-hand communication. We take a closer look at how Dr. Frey and his team are helping to personalize recovery from ‘lost’ limbs and the details of a new wireless device that could help people with severe upper limb injuries live better lives. Keeping with our brain-related theme this week, we also investigate a recent study from MIT that reveals that reading computer code is a brain beast of its own and does not precisely replicate the cognitive demands of language or math.
 

The Next Big Thing! Ferroelectric Nonvolatile Memory and Tiny Aquatic Robots Inspired by Sea Creatures

We’ve got a virtual grab bag of EE goodness in this week’s Fish Fry podcast! First up, we take a closer look at some very unique robots unveiled by a recent research study at Northwestern University. We take a closer look at how these tiny robots (which are powered by light and rotating magnetic fields) are able to walk, roll, and transport cargo. Next, Stefan Müller (CTO and Founder - FMC) joins us to discuss the details of ferroelectric nonvolatile memory and what sets it apart from other memory solutions today. Finally, we check out what needs to be done in order for artificial intelligence or machine learning to get into mainstream edge devices.

 

What is the Meaning of Test?

Testing leads to failure, and failure leads to understanding.
- Burt Rutan 

In this week’s podcast, we’re talking about testing, testing, and even more testing! We start things off with an investigation into a new microneedle patch developed at Rice University that is hoping to make testing for malaria easier and faster than ever before. Also this week, Geir Eide (Mentor) joins me to discuss the past, present, and future of IC testing. Geir and I discuss why the days of Pass/Fail testing are long gone, why test equipment has evolved into machine learning and data collection equipment, and the details of Mentor’s new Tessent Streaming Scan Network.

Radar to the Rescue: How Ainstein is Improving Our Safety through mmWave IoT Sensing

In this week’s Fish Fry podcast, we start things off with a very special News You May Have Missed. In this segment, we take a closer look at how a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine (in collaboration with IBM) have identified a “lonely” speech pattern using machine-learning models that can be used to detect loneliness in older adults.  We investigate how machine learning can help us unlock the mysteries of natural speech patterns and why this type of research may help us better understand a variety of psychological ailments. Also this week, Andrew Boushie (VP of Strategy & Partnerships - Ainstein) joins us to discuss the future of mm wave radar technology and the super cool stuff under the hood of their new over-the-door sensor called WAYV Air. 

 

Calling All Secret Weapons: element14’s Fighting Germ Challenge and A New Way to Fight Superbugs

From COVID-19 to Superbugs, this week’s podcast is all about fighting germs and battling the spread of infectious disease throughout the world. First up, we delve into some groundbreaking research that may have just unlocked a new way to fight drug-resistant superbugs. We take a closer look at why a team of scientists at Biomedicine Discovery Institute at Monash University believes that they have not only found a way to boost our immune responses to superbugs but also fight inflammation due to these pesky pathogens as well. Also this week, Tariq Ahmad joins us to discuss element14’s Fighting Germ Challenge and how one element14 community member’s call to action encouraged a global design contest.

The Dividends of Persistence: Intel’s Optane Memory and Advances in DNA Storage

“The world is one big data problem.” – by Andrew McAfee, co-director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy

In this week’s Fish Fry podcast, we investigate Intel's Optane™ DC persistent memory and how this new innovative memory can help make actionable insights more approachable and make your next data-centric design a whole lot easier. We also take a closer look at some new technology developed at North Carolina University that will shape the future of DNA storage technology.

Hearing is Believing: Artificial Intelligence, Cough Patterns, and Stemming the Tide of COVID-19

One person's data is another person's noise.” - K.C. Cole

This week’s Fish Fry podcast is all about noisy neurons, cough signature identification, and how AI can help us stem the tide of COVID-19. First up, we check out new research from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases that may have finally unlocked the mysteries of memory retention in people afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease with a little help from a bunch of mice and some very noisy neurons. Also this week, Chris Rogers (CEO - SensiML) joins us to chat about a new health monitoring solution to help fight the COVID-19 pandemic. We discuss the role of artificial intelligence in this solution and how this new platform may help detect symptoms earlier than before with identification of cough sounds.
 

StoryBoard and Cyborg Eyes: A Revolution in User Interfaces

This week’s podcast is absolutely brimming with electronic engineering goodness! First, we investigate the details of new artificial eye that can be powered by sunlight, developed by a team of researchers at Hong Kong University. Next, Jason Clarke (Crank Software) joins us to discuss user interface design, what their unique Storyboard platform is all about, and how I can get an embedded app running in minutes.

Calling All Innovators: Why You Should Join the Detect and Protect Challenge

In this week’s podcast, we take a closer look at The COVID-19 Detect & Protect Challenge. Hackster.io co-founder Adam Benzion and I chat about why The United Nations Development Programme and a multinational group of companies got together to create this challenge, the goals, prizes, and details associated with this design challenge, and most importantly, how your open source designs can help make the world a better place. Also this week, we check out new flexible sensor technology developed at MIT that is hoping to make vital sign monitoring a whole lot easier. 

 

Systems and Bodies on Chip

In this week’s Fish Fry podcast, we take on systems on chips, body on chips, and much more!  First up, we check out how Havard’s Wyss University is hoping to change the future of modern drug development and approval. We take a closer look at how this team has pieced together ten “Organ Chips” to create a fully functioning body-on-chip platform and how this new BoC system can give us comprehensive new insights into how prospective drugs will behave throughout the human body. Also this week, I chat with Yorgos Koutsoyannopoulos (Ansys) about the challenges of chip design for 5G, radio-frequency integrated circuit design workflows and how we can all avoid electromagnetic crosstalk nightmares. 

 

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